Lunch box ideas - again

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Careyb3
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Post by Careyb3 » Mon Apr 04, 2011 8:56 am

Our kindy is very strict with food but it annoys me a small homemade wholemeal muffin is frowned upon but yogurt is allowed. If anyone has ever made yogurt at home they will know how much sugar you need to put in to make it taste like those packaged tubs of yogurt. I see kids eating those rice crackers (full of MSG) or spring rolls (deep fried) which are allowed but a small piece of home made cake with no icing isnt allowed. Im not saying cake is healthy by a long shot but it seems to me a little unbalanced.

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sunny_days
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Post by sunny_days » Mon Apr 04, 2011 12:36 pm

our kindy is not strict on food - their only rules are only water and only fruit/veg for fruit time (unless discussed with the teacher, rules can be bent. There are no rules about lunch (besides the water thing).

Instead of focussing on which foods may/may not be brought in to kindy they focuss on education. A lady has been coming in for the last few terms for 'play with your vegies day'. This has been a huge hit! They get given a bunch of fruit and veg and they make animals and other things with them. A booklet then gets sent home with a recipe card and the parent has to comment on it. Next week they are off on an excursion to the fruit and veg shop to buy some fresh fruit and veg.

I think making heaps of rules will probably have the opposite effect in the long run
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missyloo
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Post by missyloo » Mon Apr 04, 2011 12:47 pm

I SOOOOOOOO agree.....

I make muffins with stevia or xylitol......no sugar and you can use wholemeal flour but I use GF flour....

Or scones with sugar free jam...


Ebony wrote:
cAtdraco wrote:What will happen if you send a healthy lunch that is not in accordance with their rules?

Because frankly, while I think it's positive for kinders to encourage healthy eating, I don't think that being overly strict is reasonable.


This is one of the issues which makes me angriest. I have two reasons. Firstly, whilst I appreciate what they're trying to achieve and support the general concept, they are not the parent. I don't see why they should be allowed to override a parent's perfectly healthy choice simply because it doesn't appear on their set list, and then take that food away and replace it with something else. Secondly, I don't believe they're teaching healthy eating one single bit. Healthy eating is about learning to make the best choices to fuel your body, it's not about creating yes/no choices and sticking to them no matter what. I know that kids are only eating a portion of their meals at school, but I still believe it has a strong influence. I don't want kids bringing unhealthy food to school either, but all too often I hear about a line being crossed. Foods like yoghurt, cheese and sandwiches with anything other than salad on it being forbidden or removed from children's lunchboxes and replaced with nothing but a piece of fruit. It makes me furious!

Anyway, off the soapbox and into the kitchen...

- Quiche
- Zucchini slice
- Lasagne
- Pasta and sauce
- Risotto
- Boiled egg
- Sandwiches
- Tuna patties
- Dried fruit mix
- Crackers/vegie sticks and dip
- Fruit salad with dipping yogurt
- Muesli bars
- Crumble, made with tinned fruit and muesli on top
- Cheese with dried apple and/or sultanas
- Pikelets, with either savoury spread or something like ricotta and honey
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Post by Saffsmum » Mon Apr 04, 2011 2:19 pm

Careyb3 wrote:Our kindy is very strict with food but it annoys me a small homemade wholemeal muffin is frowned upon but yogurt is allowed. If anyone has ever made yogurt at home they will know how much sugar you need to put in to make it taste like those packaged tubs of yogurt. I see kids eating those rice crackers (full of MSG) or spring rolls (deep fried) which are allowed but a small piece of home made cake with no icing isnt allowed. Im not saying cake is healthy by a long shot but it seems to me a little unbalanced.


This is ridiculous! Perhaps point out the ingredient list to the principal, compared with your ingredient list for homemade cake and muffins. Do they have a policy on food additives too? Otherwise they're pretty hypocritical :wink:


School Food ideas:
- Homemade popcorn made with little or no salt (keeps well in an airtight container for a few days so make a big batch)
- homemade fruit muffins (my recipie only has 1/2 cup of sugar and 1/4 cup oil - PM if you want it)
- I buy big tubs of yoghurt and decant into little tubs for lunches and sometimes 'hide' a couple of marshmallows in the bottom
- homemade pita bread pizza with lots of grated vegies as a base

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Deegirl
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Post by Deegirl » Mon Apr 04, 2011 4:26 pm

The only thing I could add to the previous suggestions are:
pikelets/pancakes - I make either banana or savoury
I usually buy a big tub of natural yoghurt and put it in a seperate container and add a fruit to sweeten. I find from a 1kg tub for $5 I can get so many servings, so much cheaper than individual packs. When he's sick of yoghurt, I make creamed rice and again just add some fruit.
You could try some salsa with breadsticks or vegetable sticks.
Crackers with toppings (at the moment I cut up cheese,cucumer slices or carrot peelings and put them with rice crackers and he likes building his own)
I can't think of anything else, but HTH. xx
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Post by Ebony » Mon Apr 04, 2011 5:45 pm

akinasmum wrote:
I don't see why they should be allowed to override a parent's perfectly healthy choice simply because it doesn't appear on their set list

Because there is a growing number of little people being obese and suffering in their teens from disease related to diet that has normally been associated with middle age.


This is why I support what they're trying to achieve. My point was if the parent HAS chosen a perfectly healthy item, why do they get to override that choice because it's not on their set list. A lot of the time when they're super strict, their set lists aren't fully reflective of a balanced diet anyway. The principle is fantastic, the execution often doesn't impress me anywhere near as much.

I agree with your muffin point though, and almost said it myself. I LOVE muffins, I think muffins are great. I particularly like them because they have a "healthy" reputation, so I eat them with little guilt. Except I know, deep down, they're just glorified cake. That's why for me, they're still a sometimes food. There are homemade exceptions, but generally, they're tiny cakes. Delicious tiny cakes...
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Eclectus
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Post by Eclectus » Mon Apr 04, 2011 6:08 pm

I dont have school age kids yet but I just don't get these really strict lunchbox rules. I dont really see the rules as productive against childhood obesity. I just don't get it :?

Are the rules more to educate parents?

Is it really the schools place to tell you what you can and can't feed your kids?

Looking back I shudder at what we were offered at the school canteen when we were kids, but we were only given the option of eating hot dogs, pies or dim sims once a week. Do today's kids learn to make healthy food choices on their own or do they binge when given a little bit of freedom?

Do the schools also encourage extra curricular sport activities at home?

Will a chocolate frog or mini packet of chips in the lunch box really have that much negative effect? What about traffic light guidelines, as long as the majority of the lunchbox is green, is an amber item going to cause that much damage? Could all this negative stigma around 'bad' foods cause eating disorders in the future?

Help! I'm baffled!! It all seems like overkill to me.
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Post by jessles » Mon Apr 04, 2011 6:20 pm

I must admit when I was looking at preschools I dismissed one because the rules stated that the child must bring a sandwich for lunch. DD1 doesn't eat sandwiches. She'll eat bread with some butter on it, then she might eat some cheese or some ham or some fruit or some carrot seperate. Even at playtime where sandwiches are provided for morning tea, she'll sit there and pull it apart. Mum reckons I should just keep at getting her to eat sandwiches - but why when she's eating healthy just not in the "normal" way.

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mrserin
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Post by mrserin » Mon Apr 04, 2011 6:30 pm

Deegirl wrote: I usually buy a big tub of natural yoghurt and put it in a seperate container and add a fruit to sweeten.


What sort of containers do you ladies use? I want to do this but they have to be able to open their own lunch at kinder and DD1 has trouble sometimes.

I pack a few different little options because DD2 changes her mind about what she likes all the time! Usually a jam sandwich, a yogurt and some fruit. Cheese sticks and carrot sticks or rice biscuits with yeast spread for morning tea.
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Post by elvencreature » Tue Apr 05, 2011 8:43 am

DD is at a kinder that is strict. Seems much stricter than I realised now that I'm reading all of these replies, actually :?

The two short days, we are allowed to send fruit or vegetables only (including dried fruit, which I do not think of as a healthy option at all) and the longer day, we are allowed to send fruit or veg for the morning, and a sandwich for the afternoon. The only rule about the sandwich is no nuts, but I am having difficulty getting DD to take a sandwich, because the kinder teachers took her sunflower spread sandwich off her on the first day because they thought it was peanut butter. Even though she's allergic to peanuts. Which they knew. So they took it off her in front of all of her friends.


Aaaaargh, I totally have issues about this! I think part of the reason why DD's kinder is so strict on what can be sent is because the group is half special needs kids though, so it makes it a bit easier for them when things are nice and consistent, but I would love to be able to send zucchini fritters, or savoury muffins!
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Post by nermylama » Tue Apr 05, 2011 9:18 am

Totally weird that they are insisting on a sandwich - I HATEDD sandwiches as a kid, for a few years I got them every day and I would just bin them because I preferred to go hungry than to eat one. Then I finally built up the courage to tell my mum and she started sending crackers instead.
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Post by Saffsmum » Tue Apr 05, 2011 2:11 pm

Sorry to take this OT, but I'm curious to know more about those whose kinders/schools have 'rules' about what foods you can and can't bring. I've only ever heard of no-nut rules before (yes I'm very sheltered :lol: )

Are the rules actually rules or are they guidelines? Are they actually put together by a qualified dietician or just someone's idea of what is healthy? I know I'd certainly be questioning some of these ideas as to what is healthy and what is not.

Are these private facilities or state run?

And in answer to the containers for yogurt, I didn't do this until DD was old enough to open the container herself - probably age 6? I bought a generic brand of small lidded plastic container. Perhaps take your LO shopping with you and try out a few different styles to see what they can handle.

Gosh, they seem to expect a lot from a Kinder aged child! I couldn't imagine my DD having had to do so much for herself at that age!

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Grace
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Post by Grace » Tue Apr 05, 2011 8:35 pm

Probably some parents do need the help of "rules" - DS1 comes home from school and tells me about the jelly & lollies his classmates have, chocolate milk, chips etc. Believe me if you think healthy rules are OTT, how about lollies for lunch and jelly at "fruit time"? :?

For 'plain taste' son we pack a sandwich (cheese & lettuce, egg & lettuce, cream cheese, or home made jam & butter)
Yoghurt (some of the squeezie tubes are pretty low in sugar, try vanilla)
Cut up fruit in a little container
Home made cookie (carob & oat)
For 'healthy tastes' DS2 we pack vegie sticks (celery, carrot, green beans) with hummos or cream cheese
Cheese & plain crackers
Fruit, yoghurt,
home made muffins (google "Failsafe muffins" EASY AS!!)
Salad with lettuce, chicken, avocado, chickpeas, butter beans etc
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Serendipity
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Post by Serendipity » Tue Oct 18, 2011 2:06 pm

Very interesting read. Was wondering where fruit bread stood in all these rules? Ask as DD really enjoys fruit bread (super yummy one from delish bread shop) with cream cheese and grated carrot sandwiches.
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Post by athome » Sat Feb 11, 2012 1:12 pm

I send the kids with a big lunchbox filled with smaller lunch boxes if that makes sense. I send them with smoked chicken breast sliced, hoummas, mixed nuts, bread sticks, carrot sticks, a banana and a stone fruit or orange

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