Autism spectrum disorders

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Grace
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Post by Grace » Wed Oct 17, 2012 8:00 pm

Thanks Katw, I took your advice and let DS1 "sensory it out" and then I gave him an Epsom Salt bath. Has anyone else tried the baths? This was our first one and DS1 amazingly soaked still and quietly for a full 20 minutes and was happy and lucid afterwards, telling me how relaxed he felt. I will be checking with his paediatrician next app to see how often this is recommended. Will try once a week in the mean time.
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Post by lovely mummy » Thu Oct 18, 2012 3:03 pm

Grace wrote: What do others do to "reach" or calm their ASD child? I could do with some pointers and tips.
The sort of things you're looking for apply not only to asd kids but others who also have sensory integration issues - some ot's run sessions with kids/adults to figure out which sensory tools can work for a particular child. So they go through the senses & maybe something will help a particular child depending on whether they're over or under stimulated - eg: things like blowing bubbles, swinging, having crunchy food, exerting themselves through swimming or cycling, watching a lava lamp, having someone wrap them up firmly, watching a show, carrying a weighty item for a while. With sensory issues, it's about finding some activities in your tool belt that u know may help your child when they're 'going crazy' or about to, & hopefully they 'll be able to focus for a while after u do what it is you've found works. Some things only give short term benefits whilst others help for a little longer, depending on your child.

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Post by keyfive » Thu Oct 18, 2012 3:49 pm

Grace, we've just started the epsom salt baths. We do 2 cups of epsom salts in a bath 2-3 times a week. Only been doing it a couple of weeks now but it seems to make a difference. I've got an article on how the epsom salts work if you want me to email it to you? I tried the epsom salt bath myself the other day and I had a really relaxed day the next day - it was great!
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katw
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Post by katw » Thu Oct 18, 2012 4:17 pm

Baths work well for Superhero, b ut I haven't tried epsom salts. I need to find somewhere that sells lots, since DH will use them up :roll:

My bro was advised to put a jar of epsom salts on his puter to absorb the radiation or something....that was years ago, and I've no idea if it works/is needed/whatever, but I've done it ever since, just in case.

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Post by trilbs » Fri Oct 26, 2012 6:24 am

This epsom salt bath sounds interesting, is it the addition of the epsom salts that make it more sensory?

Grace, we definately notice DS goes through phases (a few days to a week) where he is more 'autistic'. Last 2 times it has co-incided with the full moon and I think it is coming up again soon.

Well we are going away on saturday, driving 7hrs to see family and then go a bit further to Yeppoon to stay at a resort. On the way back we will visit the big zoo on the sunny coast, which will be the biggest challenge. Big, public places he is unfamiliar with usually end in tears (though tears would be an understatement lol) We have yet to see an OT so i'm not sure what sort of things work for DS, so am open to ideas? Any tools that work for you?

He has a minky blanket I thought I might put under the pram and maybe let him go in the pram (put DD in the manduca) and cover himself? Not sure if it will work but he loves to be covered by doonas and blankets at home. Also try to give him ideas what to expect like who we will see first, etc..
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Grace
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Post by Grace » Fri Oct 26, 2012 6:45 pm

Trilbs, if your DS likes to be covered in a blanket he may enjoy some of the "weighted" items to feel calm. Our OT suggested a heavy backpack to wear, or simply downward pressure on the shoulders can be relaxing. There are Online sensory shops that sell all sorts of calming items - from fidget toys to full body wraps. Very interesting. :)

The Epsom salt baths replace magnesium sulfate in your body, which helps the body to flush a backlog of phenols and salicylates. My DS1 is on the Failsafe diet (through a dietitian) because he can't process salicylates which is a problem with a lot of ASD children. We have since had another couple of baths and DS1 is back to "normal" (able to listen and not melting down) so the baths have been wonderful for him.

Have fun on your holiday Trilbs!
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Grace
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Post by Grace » Fri Oct 26, 2012 6:48 pm

Lovelymummy thanks for all those sensory suggestions. I think we will factor in another OT visit to see if they can access DS1 in that regard.
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Post by lovely mummy » Fri Oct 26, 2012 6:59 pm

Grace wrote:Lovelymummy thanks for all those sensory suggestions. I think we will factor in another OT visit to see if they can access DS1 in that regard.
I vaguely recall the assessment primarily involves a very very long questionnaire, Grace. Perhaps you can get that b4 your visit & return it to the ot, so you don't waste time & then the ot can go through the results with you when u next c him/her.

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Post by AbbeyCat » Mon Nov 05, 2012 12:53 pm

Hi, I'm trying to help out a man who is in my Baby Sign Language course, as he doesn't have internet access. Many apologies if I use incorrect terminology.

His son is on the autism spectrum and has just turned 5. He is non-verbal. Father is hoping to incorporate sign language. Currently doing PECS(?).

Unfortunately the sign language teacher is teaching us lots of Auslan signs and full sentences that are useful with babies and young children, but isn't telling us (and has no interest in telling us) how to best incorporate it in to our daily lives. The father is really wanting a concrete plan for how to introduce signs in the most efficient and useful way.

Wondering whether anyone had experience with using Auslan sign language with children on the autism spectrum.

TIA
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Post by mooki » Mon Nov 05, 2012 1:02 pm

Hi Cat, hope Im not imposing on the thread. Both schools Ive worked in have used makaton signing. Makaton signs are spoken as they are said. I think its now known as key word signs? Auslan is a language so slighlty different.

I would suggest maybe if his son is seeing a SLT that they might have some suggestions

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Andrew's Mum
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Post by Andrew's Mum » Mon Nov 05, 2012 8:24 pm

Yep tell him to look up key word signing, but his best bet is using his speech pathologist.
Key Word Signing uses spoken word paired with the Auslan vocabulary: and only key words in a sentence are signed, so in the sentence "The cat sat on the mat" depending on what is the key concept you're trying to get across you might sign "cat" "on" and "mat". Auslan signs are probably better than Baby Signs usually because they are standardised, so more people can understand them. There's a great dictionary available free on line.
Auslan would use no spoken words and would have the words in a different order.
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AbbeyCat
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Post by AbbeyCat » Mon Nov 05, 2012 8:46 pm

Thanks guys.

Our Baby Sign class appears to be Auslan signs for each word in spoken English grammatical order.

Will give him info on key word signing.
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Post by Pipsee » Sun Dec 16, 2012 6:26 am

AbbeyCat wrote:Hi, I'm trying to help out a man who is in my Baby Sign Language course, as he doesn't have internet access. Many apologies if I use incorrect terminology.

His son is on the autism spectrum and has just turned 5. He is non-verbal. Father is hoping to incorporate sign language. Currently doing PECS(?).

Unfortunately the sign language teacher is teaching us lots of Auslan signs and full sentences that are useful with babies and young children, but isn't telling us (and has no interest in telling us) how to best incorporate it in to our daily lives. The father is really wanting a concrete plan for how to introduce signs in the most efficient and useful way.

Wondering whether anyone had experience with using Auslan sign language with children on the autism spectrum.

TIA
Hi!

DD is non-verbal and 5 and we've been doing sign with her for a long time. But it's not as effective as PECS or PODD. We actually go against the grain and use both communication systems (PECS for her to talk to us and PODD for us to talk to her). I found that any sign doesn't REALLY work (she knows one gesture after 3 years of therapies, "more"). I think it's because sign is just another language really, so the issues that stop her from mimicking speaking language are probably going to stop her using signing language as well. That will be different for every child with ASD of course. But for us we are just concentrating on the basics of gestures - nodding/shaking head for yes/no, more, stop, food, drink. And for more complex things we use PECS and PODD. I would encourage this dad to concentrate on getting PECS and PODD training. It works so much better than sign with most of the ASD kids at Charlotte's schools. Gesturing isn't something that everyone is going to understand either, whereas PECS or PODD are relatively easier for other members of the community to understand. I don't know many people who understand sign language, but almost everyone I know understands what a picture of a stop sign means, or a dog, or a hospital cross. Am I making sense?
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Pipsee
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Post by Pipsee » Sun Dec 16, 2012 6:37 am

I should explain that PECS is picture exchanging, where the child has a Velcro book full of pictures that represent stuff in their daily life. PODD is an organized book of sentence pathways using pictures. PODD is easier for parents to use but takes longer for the child to understand. Apparently it's a better long term system as well and is easier to transport from place to place as it doesn't have removable parts. PECS is much harder for parents to use. You definitely need the right training and you need to know the correction procedures exactly, there's not much room for mistakes. However, PECS can work almost instantly for kids if it's done right. So they're communicating quicker.
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Post by Pipsee » Sun Dec 16, 2012 6:39 am

Sorry if all this is gobbledygook, it's early and I'm using my phone and breastfeeding at the same time.
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Ernie is going strong, like a little man with a little plan!

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