Autism spectrum disorders

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Postby trilbs » Wed Sep 12, 2012 4:01 pm

Well the psychologist went through all her information and the different markers they have to meet to be on the spectrum. She believes he has Autism (high fuctioning), not Asperger's or PDD-NOS as the pediatrician first thought (his initial view was based on just that appointment, he referred us to her) So in 2wks we go to pediatrician to make it official. I knew it was coming and was keen to know, but I still feel a bit weird now IYKWIM? I don't know, maybe all this speculation has finally come to a head. Now it's all new territory :shock:
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Postby Westaussie77 » Wed Sep 12, 2012 4:23 pm

Yes until that diagnosis is finalised, I was just hoping it would something he would "grow out of"

I think you grieve a little when you get the official diagnosis.

In WA we have to get a speech therapist, clinical psych and paed to agree before a diagnosis. Costs over $1000 to go private :-S
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Postby trilbs » Wed Sep 12, 2012 4:45 pm

He did see 2 different speech therapists before we saw the pediatrician so I believe he took that into account.

Well I have been through alot of emotional stuff since we started to look into all of this, now I feel alot more at peace than I did before. Still it's the first time we've known 100% he is on the spectrum. Maybe there was a flicker of possibility he wouldn't be, but I never truly thought about it. I feel a bit weary, like i've just run a marathon. But we are only at the beginning of the journey?

Hugs to everyone, it's hard to know how to be supportive to any of you when it's all so unknown to me. But i'm here xx
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Postby katw » Wed Sep 12, 2012 6:54 pm

I checked back esp to see if you'd posted trilbs. I hope you get some plans and peace of mind in place quickly.
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Postby Little Tiggermum » Wed Sep 12, 2012 9:30 pm

well I broke down at work today... luckily in the managers office. but I'm appreciating the people i work with. just came over and mentioned quietly that they're there to help, and buzzed off again before I burst into tears again. saw all of my clients for the day too so didn't end up being too bad. I'm amazed at how emotional I am really.
WA I'm so glad you have advocate with you. Just because the school doesn't have the understanding shouldn't mean that your son is disadvantaged. Focus on the solution not the problem peoples.
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Postby Pipsee » Sun Sep 16, 2012 7:16 pm

here's a blog that's a bit of a laugh and a bit of a sigh, it's so true! - all the things that get pushed our way!

http://blogginglily.blogspot.com.au/2012/09/flush-sporns.html?spref=fb
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Postby pseudo » Sun Sep 16, 2012 7:26 pm

I hope you don't mind me posting in here but one of my very good friends is concerned about her daughter atm but the doctor said she is too young to know or do anything for yet.

What age did you notice that something was different with your child?

Her little girl is 14 months now but my friend feels as though she has known something is different ever since she was a newborn. Could this be possible?
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Postby trilbs » Sun Sep 16, 2012 8:01 pm

pseudo wrote:I hope you don't mind me posting in here but one of my very good friends is concerned about her daughter atm but the doctor said she is too young to know or do anything for yet.

What age did you notice that something was different with your child?

Her little girl is 14 months now but my friend feels as though she has known something is different ever since she was a newborn. Could this be possible?


I am definately no expert, I missed all the signs for a long time. However looking back on videos of DS as an older baby, you can see it a little. He wouldn't give as much eye contact and seems very fixated on what he is doing. I think having DD now she is so social, communicative and constantly looks at us, it is more noticeable in retrospect. The CHN had slight concerns at his 18mth check but I didn't like her manner which resulted in my totally ignoring what she said. Being our first we also didn't know what was normal behaviour really. I think it is possible to see differences in babies but I don't think there is much they will do about it?
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Postby lovely mummy » Mon Sep 17, 2012 11:15 am

pseudo wrote:Could this be possible?


I don't know how early one could get an assessment/diagnosis, but where a child needs assistance, the earlier any potential issue is picked up, the earlier intervention services can b used. Even with issues unrelated to as disorders, eg a child with sensory integration issues, the earlier u get help, the better for your child & you. If your friend is concerned about as disorders perhaps she can contact the autism org help line in her state for advice.

I would suggest a second opinion from another gp or paed. GP's r generalists, not specialists.
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Postby Little Tiggermum » Mon Sep 17, 2012 6:47 pm

If she has concerns, then she should act on them until she feels satisfied. Early intervention can help so much. That said, bulldog didn't have"typical"signs.he was an adorable cuddly boy...he just couldn't communicate his needs other than booby.
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Postby JennyD » Mon Sep 17, 2012 7:09 pm

Looking back DS had signs from when he was under 12 months, but I just thought he was a different child. He didn't reciprocate, he still doesn't :) I never thought it was important. As he got older, like 2 I knew he was different, just thought he was eccentric like his parents and grandparents. Turned out he was, autistic like his father and grandfathers :) It is hard, and unless it is dramatic it possibly can't be diagnosed that early, but well worth looking into it. With DS2 we saw problems early so we accessed speech and other interventions and he is coping well. We accessed these long before we had a diagnosis, the Child Health Nurse was happy to refer for speech and OT assistance.
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Postby trilbs » Tue Oct 16, 2012 6:29 am

Hows everyone? :)

Well DS got the official diagnosis, have applied for the funding and what not. Then we can start speech therapy. He has started at an ECDU (special preschool) for a few hours a week, next year he will go for longer. He will still go to regular daycare 2 days a week too as they say it's good to do both.

I must say that DD is so much different to him, obviously all kids are different, but what I mean is she gives so much more? If that makes any sense. So much more engaging and interactive, really had no idea how little DS interacted with us in comparison. He is our first so I suppose it just seemed normal. I suppose boys might be a bit less social as well but the difference is vast. She gives me more eye contact in a minute than he does all day! Do other mums with both kids not on and on the spectrum notice this?
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Postby JennyD » Tue Oct 16, 2012 10:21 am

Hi trilbs

Glad you have a diagnosis, while it is hard to accept sometimes, it does make things easier. It is great to get support and things will get better now :)

trilbs wrote:I must say that DD is so much different to him, obviously all kids are different, but what I mean is she gives so much more? If that makes any sense.


We were the same, it wasn't until DD2 came along and we were beginning to think she was some social genius, that we realised it wasn't that she was advanced, it was that DS was behind. When she was 2 and he was 5 she was more socially capable than he was, it just made it so obvious that something was going on.
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Postby Grace » Tue Oct 16, 2012 7:32 pm

Trilbs that is good news about the early intervention and funding. Yes because our eldest is ASD we do notice differences as the younger children get older and are socialising. For instance my DD who isn't even 3 yet has "friends" and actually plays together with other kids at playgroup. My DS1 did not notice other kids in these situations. As he gets older he becomes more interested and pays more attention, but it depends on what mood he is in.

We are having a rough time this week. DS1 has been very introverted to the point of not tuning into any instruction at all, very frustrating. His play has been extremely tactile with sand, water and dirt and we can barely have a one sentence conversation with him. He has also been disobedient, pedantic, silly, rude, defiant, explosive, forgetful, clumsy, anti-social.... It's depressing to put it out there but gee it's hard when it's hard. DH was getting mad at DS1 tonight as he was splashing water all over the floor in the bath, then apparently unable to dress himself and being explosive and yelling at DH... Anyway I went in and gave DS1 a firm back and shoulder massage followed by an "aspie " back tickle where I draw shapes on his bare back and he guesses what they are. 5 minututes later he was focused enough to do some homework and seemed happier.
What do others do to "reach" or calm their ASD child? I could do with some pointers and tips.
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Postby katw » Tue Oct 16, 2012 8:19 pm

Hugs Grace, it's hard...sometimes I find I just have to let S "sensory it out" IYKWIM, let her indulge in tactile play. My OT told me once "they will stop when they've had enough" and those are the words I live by some days :lol: I just try not to get too close and as far as possible provide opportunities for it to happen in some level of safety/appropriateness.

I just yesterday got totally over hearing myself say "Don't climb on the back of that chair!!!" (and Miss ASD is not the worst offender there) so I made a foot box, filled with sensoty experiences for the feet - pebbles, sandpaper, macaroni in a zip-lock bag, mixed dried beans in a ziplock bag, and I even found a thick cardboard tube for them to roll and balance on. So far it's been enjoyed, but they've been playing outside so much I don't know if it's stopped the climbing yet :lol:

I've been doing a Positive Partnerships workshop today (I think I'm allowed to name it - it's a govt thing? It's aimed at parents of school aged kids with ASD) I'm a bit exhausted now...so much to think about....I think I must have learned a lot, I just have to re-read everything and filter out what's not so relevant. It's been really good though, to talk to other IRL people with ASD-kids, there are a few at school, but it's always good to compare notes outside of the school too!
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