Autism spectrum disorders

Discuss general parenting issues here.
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Nordicbabe
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Post by Nordicbabe » Sun Dec 16, 2012 9:03 am

:) nice to see you!
Hope all is well with you and yours
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Pipsee
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Post by Pipsee » Sun Dec 16, 2012 9:06 am

I know... I randomly pop up here and there...
:roll: :D
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s squirrel
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Post by s squirrel » Sun Dec 16, 2012 9:12 am

Random can be good!
:smt039 to both NB and Pipsee
:-D
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katw
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Post by katw » Wed Jan 30, 2013 1:32 pm

Just posting in a link for those looking for Aspergers info - this guy is very useful - and compassionate, easy to understand, and includes lots of info about girls, too. Here's a radio interview.
http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/201 ... versations
katw - mum to 3 girls Superhero 2002, Fairy 2006, Goldeneyes 2009 and one boy - Lennylion 2012

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Nordicbabe
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Post by Nordicbabe » Wed Jan 30, 2013 4:16 pm

I promptly listened and shared :)
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Andrew's Mum
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Post by Andrew's Mum » Fri Feb 01, 2013 8:20 pm

Hey those of you with kids starting school ,this week how did you go? LTM? nordicbabe? Anyone else?
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Little Tiggermum
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Post by Little Tiggermum » Fri Feb 01, 2013 8:28 pm

Well first day R had to carry him to the school. Didn't like the clothes, didn't like the boots... Didn't like the tractor and trailer drawing on the labels... but eventually he was dressed. one of the buddies met him at school, and the teacher decided to bribe him with toy cars. He decided he liked her when his arms were full, so followed her into the classroom. after that apparently he had a good day. Today was better but not brilliant. but the principal hasn't organised funding as yet despite us preparing her since June. :roll: but he's got an aide starting next week.
Is it normal to get no say in who they employ as an aide? I dont like the person on personal grounds but I do agree that her knowledge of austism would be impeccable seeing as I've met her non verbal severe brother... and she's very good with him. Just miffed that we weren't considered.
Then again once the proper fundign come through it may change. she's only employed for the first term as far as I'm aware.
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Andrew's Mum
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Post by Andrew's Mum » Fri Feb 01, 2013 8:41 pm

We don't have any say in who supports DS. Qld is a little bit different because the funding is provided to the school to support all kids with disability not handed with an amount labelled for a kid, so it means that there isn't one person employed necessarily with DS' funding. I'm really pleased with the special ed teacher who supports DS this year.
Legally though, you do have to agree to any adjustments that are made so that bulldog can participate in the Prep program. Glad things are going well so far.
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Andrew's Mum
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Post by Andrew's Mum » Fri Feb 01, 2013 8:43 pm

And this is a great resource if anyone is interested in ways to support their child with ASD make the transition to school (some info is Qld specific but lots of it is very useful). http://education.qld.gov.au/asd-online-resource-kit/
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Nordicbabe
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Post by Nordicbabe » Sat Feb 02, 2013 7:03 am

Mr 5 has been doing really well. So far :wink:
I think we are having a bit of a honeymoon period :lol: he will soon realise how long the days are.
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Yankee
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Re: Autism spectrum disorders

Post by Yankee » Fri Sep 04, 2015 2:20 pm

I was at a talk about Aspergers this week and although I knew a bit about it, I was really fascinated to learn about girls and women with Aspergers. Apparently they have the same underlying differences in the brain as boys, but they tend to cope with it differently - instead of acting out, they withdraw, watch, and put on a 'mask' of 'normal' behaviour. Which means they don't get diagnosed as easily as boys because they can 'hide' for longer. And sometimes they can hold it together at school/in public, only to 'explode' when they get home, which the school tends to blame on the parents ('she's perfect in class, I don't see what the problem is').

There's a description here, in case anyone else is interested:
When boys who have Asperger's syndrome make a social error, their response may be to become agitated and their clumsy and immature social play skills are quite conspicuous and annoying to peers and adults. There is recognition that this child needs an assessment and intervention. Girls are more likely to apologise and appease when making a social error. Peers and adults may then forgive and forget, but without realising that a pattern is emerging. However, the girl with Asperger's syndrome is increasingly recognising her social confusion and frequent faux pas. She may react by trying not to be noticed in a group, for others to be aware of her social confusion, preferring to be on the periphery of social situations. However, girls with Asperger's syndrome can be avid observers of human behaviour and try to decipher what they are supposed to do or say. Another strategy to having problems with social reasoning is by being well behaved and compliant at school so as not to be noticed or recognised as a different. A girl with Asperger's syndrome may suffer social confusion in silence and isolation in the classroom or playground but she may be a different character at home, the 'mask' is removed, and she uses passive aggressive behaviour to control her family and social experiences.
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tuongtrante1
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Re: Autism spectrum disorders

Post by tuongtrante1 » Fri Jun 17, 2016 8:12 am

What exactly is the fail safe diet? Is there any consistent proof that it works across the spectrum? :?

Jenbt85
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Re: Autism spectrum disorders

Post by Jenbt85 » Sat Jun 18, 2016 8:13 am

tuongtrante1 wrote:What exactly is the fail safe diet? Is there any consistent proof that it works across the spectrum? :?
The fail safe elimination diet is where you eliminate food chemical groups (both naturally occurring and processed) for two to three weeks, then reintroduce each food chemical groups to test for a reaction. I have done the diet, though not for links with autism. I'm happy to pm you a good website on this diet if you'd like.

I understand that the GAPS diet (which I'm looking into to heal from intolerances) focuses on links between diet and autism symptoms, but I think while they've found links between change in diet and improvements to autistic characteristics, it's not a proven link (I only know from superficial readings).
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